#OscarsBlackAF: My Thoughts on the 2017 Oscar Nominations

The 2017 Academy Award nominations were announced on Tuesday, and I was too lazy to post my thoughts on them at the time. But I’m ready to do so now. Leggo.

First, this year’s crop of nominees is clearly the most diverse Oscar has ever seen. For the first time in history, people of color have been nominated in every acting category in a single awards year. Also, Moonlight‘s Barry Jenkins scored nominations for Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Picture — a trifecta never before achieved by a Black filmmaker.

This year’s awards are so diverse that we could honestly say #OscarsBlackAF. Continue reading “#OscarsBlackAF: My Thoughts on the 2017 Oscar Nominations”

Photo of the Week: Mimosas

There’s really not much of a story to go along with this one. I was having brunch at one of my neighborhood haunts, The General Greene, and I’d been out and about taking photos with my Lomo LC-A 120.

The LC-A 120 is a fantastic camera: It’s a compact lightweight medium format camera, and it takes magnificent photos. It’s pretty much the medium format equivalent to the legendary Lomo LC-A+.

Continue reading “Photo of the Week: Mimosas”

Why I Enjoyed “Moonlight” and “La La Land,” 2016’s Best Films

The two best films of 2016 won big at Sunday night’s Golden Globes ceremony: Moonlight and La La Land.

I found both movies to be profoundly touching and transcendent — not to mention exhilaratingly entertaining. And both films hit me in ways that were completely surprising.

Continue reading “Why I Enjoyed “Moonlight” and “La La Land,” 2016’s Best Films”

Photo of the Week: Morgan Camera Shop

This photo of a now defunct camera shop was taken during my trip to Los Angeles last year. I was staying in the middle of Hollywood, and passed this building on my various jaunts.

Why it captured my attention, I don’t know. But apparently I’m not alone. A cursory Google search will bring up other people’s photos, plus history lessons on the building. For instance, this little tidbit from the Los Angeles Conservancy:

Though the design of the two-story vernacular building has been attributed to Modernist architect Rudolph Schindler, the original permit lists Marshall P. Wilkinson as the architect. Wilkinson was known primarily for his residential work in Los Angeles.

The building’s distinctive signage appears to have been heavily influenced by the Bauhaus School, which taught the unification of art, craft, and technology. It reveals the important role that commercial signage played in Hollywood’s development, juxtaposing materials, icons, and scales to attract passing motorists.

I also posted a black and white photo on Instagram, which got a decent amount of likes.

Picture that. #Hollywood #JFxxLA #jfxxxvi

A photo posted by Jay Fingers (@jayfingers) on


The next time I’m in L.A., I think I’ll take another photo, but with a different camera or film format.