📸 Photo of the Week: On Tap 📸

I’m trying, I’m trying, I’m trying to do this on a more consistent basis. Bear with me.

As you can clearly see, this photo is of the many different taps at a bar. What you don’t know is that this photo — taken on 400 ISO 35mm film with the Lomo LC-A+ — was taken at Yard House in L.A. Live during my last trip to Los Angeles.

It was an overcast Sunday, and I was killing time before an Oscars viewing party (that I never actually attended), and I needed a drink badly. I stopped into Yard House, where bartenders Hugo and Jimmy were behind the stick, pouring all manner of libations to satisfy my alcoholic cravings. Continue reading “📸 Photo of the Week: On Tap 📸”

📸 Photo of the Week: Hollywood & Vine 📸

Seeing as “the Mulligan” will be happening in a little less than two weeks, I decided to revisit one of the actual film photos I took while I was in Los Angeles.

Continue reading “📸 Photo of the Week: Hollywood & Vine 📸”

Photo of the Week: Ornaments

I know, I know. I’m woefully behind on blogging, especially with regard to the soon-to-be-beloved “Photo of the Week.” And for that, I apologize.

This week’s photo is actually from this past holiday season. I love these huge Christmas ornaments, which can be found outside the Chase building on Sixth Avenue during the days of Yule. They’re very popular, and are often photographed by natives and tourists alike.

Continue reading “Photo of the Week: Ornaments”

Photo of the Week: Morgan Camera Shop

This photo of a now defunct camera shop was taken during my trip to Los Angeles last year. I was staying in the middle of Hollywood, and passed this building on my various jaunts.

Why it captured my attention, I don’t know. But apparently I’m not alone. A cursory Google search will bring up other people’s photos, plus history lessons on the building. For instance, this little tidbit from the Los Angeles Conservancy:

Though the design of the two-story vernacular building has been attributed to Modernist architect Rudolph Schindler, the original permit lists Marshall P. Wilkinson as the architect. Wilkinson was known primarily for his residential work in Los Angeles.

The building’s distinctive signage appears to have been heavily influenced by the Bauhaus School, which taught the unification of art, craft, and technology. It reveals the important role that commercial signage played in Hollywood’s development, juxtaposing materials, icons, and scales to attract passing motorists.

I also posted a black and white photo on Instagram, which got a decent amount of likes.

Picture that. #Hollywood #JFxxLA #jfxxxvi

A photo posted by Jay Fingers (@jayfingers) on


The next time I’m in L.A., I think I’ll take another photo, but with a different camera or film format.